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Morgan Hill
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October 16, 2021

Taylor Made: It’s how you play the game

As another youth baseball campaign nears completion and
postseason play now becomes the focal point, parents tend to
reflect and assess the season. In doing so, each parent should take
a few things into consideration before determining if the season
was a success for their child. Wins and losses, trophies and making
the All-Stars should not figure into the equation. There are three
things every parent should look at in deeming the season a valuable
experience.
As another youth baseball campaign nears completion and postseason play now becomes the focal point, parents tend to reflect and assess the season. In doing so, each parent should take a few things into consideration before determining if the season was a success for their child. Wins and losses, trophies and making the All-Stars should not figure into the equation.

There are three things every parent should look at in deeming the season a valuable experience.

First, did the coaches teach my child how to play the game better, develop better sportsmanship, character and respect for the game. Also, in teaching the game to your son or daughter, did they cover both the physical and mental part of the game. Do your children know more now than they did at the beginning of the year? Did the coaches spend some quality time on the field with your youngster and get to know them as a person?

The second thing to look at is, did my child have fun? Did he develop new and lasting friendships? Did he laugh at his mistakes and his triumphs? Did he develop some type of bond with the coach that will leave an impression on him in years to come? Did he ever say to you on the ride home, without you prompting him, “You know, that was a lot of fun today.” And, most importantly, is he going to play next year?

Thirdly, did you as a parent, maintain self control on and off the field all season long? Did you refrain from yelling at your kid because he struck out three times or couldn’t‚t throw a strike? Did you refrain from yelling instructions on every pitch? Did you show respect to umpires, other parents or coaches? Did you cheer at games in a manner that was supportive? Did you bite your lip when you became frustrated with your son and calmly talk about things the next day after the game? Did you play catch or hit with them once during the season?

If you can answer yes to a lot of these questions, then you can begin to piece together an assessment of the overall season from both a tangible and intangible view.

If some nos are popping up, that will give you an indication of some things that need to improve for next year. Some of them you can control and some you can’t.

So, forget about where your son’s team finished in the standings, how many hits he got or how many players he struck out.

Statistics never win games, players and teams do.

Look at your child and yourself as objectively as you can.

Remember, first place finishes are nice and it’s fun to be a part of a championship caliber team, or a team that does well. But there is only one winner and only a few select players that make the All-Stars.

However, every player that competed this season is a winner, just by being on the field.

And, if you can find some positive things to take into the future then the year can be assessed as productive and successful.

Elite high school pitcher’s camp in July

Taylor Made Baseball is offering an elite High School Pitcher’s Camp in Morgan Hill next month.

The camp, which will cover everything from pitching mechanics to mental training, will run from July 25-29 from 9am-4pm.

Each day will cover a different aspect of the best position in baseball. Players will receive instruction in: pitching mechanics; throwing mechanics; defensive baseball; mental preparation and execution; pitching levels and locations; developing physical and mental pre-game and post-game regimens; arm-strengthening; physical conditioning; weight training; and proper nutrition for high school athletes. Each morning will be devoted to pitching mechanics and defensive baseball. In the afternoons, there will be a trip to 24-Hour Fitness to work on proper weight routines and physical conditioning. On Tuesday of that week, the group will spend time on arm strengthening and mental training with Alan Jaeger. On Thursday, the Morgan Hill Physical Therapy Office will provide the players with conditioning training and proper arm care tips, in addition to information on how to recognize and diagnose arm pain and what to do. Thursday evening will be a parent get-together to discuss what to do in getting your son ready for college, both academically and athletically.

Players will receive: J-Bands; Alan Jaeger’s Book, “Getting Focused, Staying Focused”; Evaluation Form; Charts to record weight training progress, arm strength progress and nutrition; Weight workout handout; Physical Conditioning handout

Rich Taylor and a local staff of coaches will lead the camp. Alan Jaeger will conduct his “Thrive on Throwing” program and mental training sessions. Fresno State pitching coach Tim Montez will instruct players on what it takes to pitch at the Division I level.

The camp will be limited to just 24 players in order to insure quality instruction

Players must be in high school or entering high school in the fall. Cost of the camp is $325 for 30 hours of instruction and will include admission to 24-Hour Fitness, the J-Bands and Alan Jaeger’s book. Deposit is $150.

To sign up or for more information, contact Rich Taylor by phone at (408) 782-0630 or by e-mail, [email protected]

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