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Morgan Hill
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September 27, 2022

Cost of driving, auto fees increase

Giving more money to the state Department of Motor Vehicles
isn
’t a common New Year’s resolution among citizens. Nevertheless,
effective Jan. 1, the state has made it a New Year’s
requirement.
Giving more money to the state Department of Motor Vehicles isn’t a common New Year’s resolution among citizens. Nevertheless, effective Jan. 1, the state has made it a New Year’s requirement.

The fee hike went into effect Thursday, in theory, but today in practice, since the DMV was closed for New Year’s Day.

Among the increases are the following:

• The fee to get a driver’s license will jump from $15 to $24 statewide, or 60 percent.

• The cost of getting a duplicate license will increase from $12 to $19, or 58 percent.

• The fee to register a vehicle will go up from $28 to $31, or 11 percent.

• The California Highway Patrol fee paid with registration will rise from $2 to $9, or 450 percent.

• The non-operation fee for a vehicle will go up from $10 to $15, or 50 percent.

• The cost of a salvage certificate will rise from $3 to $15, or 500 percent.

• The cost of a non-driver’s-license identification card will jump from $6 to $20, or 233 percent. This card is still free for senior citizens, however.

The revenue from these fees helps fund the CHP, the DMV and the Air Resources Board. CHP’s new homeland-security responsibilities have put pressure on this fund, and so the state Senate initiated the fee hikes to avoid a shortfall. The bill was introduced in the Senate on Feb. 27, and then-Gov. Gray Davis signed it into law on Oct. 8.

The DMV fee hikes are among hundreds of new regulations to become law in California on Jan. 1.

Staff Report
A staff member edited this provided article.

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